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Can you shoot a dog attacking your dog

Can you shoot a dog attacking your dog


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Can you shoot a dog attacking your dog? If you’re dog-walking in Manhattan on a busy Monday, you might think you can but, in fact, you can’t.

A few weeks ago I was walking my border terrier mix along Manhattan’s Columbus Avenue. I’m usually a light walker, I love the quiet and the scenery, so I can’t bear to interrupt it by jogging. So, it’s a brisk walk along the park. In the park, a woman carrying an open umbrella came out of the park carrying a leash. My dog was sitting on the leash, calm and silent, looking at the birds. Suddenly the leash dropped out of the woman’s hand. My dog was standing on the leash. The woman yelled and cursed. My dog walked over to her, looked up into her face, put his mouth up to her face, and licked her.

By the time I came out of the park I had a dozen pedestrians following me and I was yelling. In my defense, I was screaming, “No!”

One woman said, “That is a pit bull. That woman is crazy.”

“That dog,” I replied, “is my dog and she isn’t crazy.”

She insisted that if that was my dog, it must be a pit bull.

Another woman, in a long fur coat, said, “Well, your dog isn’t my dog. If she wants to eat people, at least make sure she’s a nice girl.”

I explained to the woman that my dog was a mix. Her nose looked a little like a terrier, and her coat looked a little like a Labrador, but her paws were big and the shape of a pit bull. She was very athletic and very active, though very polite, and so had been trained to behave around people. She also had been very badly abused and she was afraid of people.

I explained to her that my dog was just doing her job as a watchdog. She was standing sentry and she had just taken a short nap. She looked like she had just been playing, but when that woman came running through the park in her high heels, she had assumed her position and hadn’t moved since. My dog didn’t bite the woman, but she had attacked her and pulled at her in an attempt to pull her down. She didn’t touch the woman’s face. I think my dog just wanted to play.

I explained to her that if she pulled on the leash, she was going to pull at my arm. She could have dragged me over. She could have hurt me. She would have got my attention. If I was going to bring her back with me, I had to have some control. If she was that close to me, I couldn’t control her. She couldn’t have dragged me to the ground by the collar. That would have hurt my neck. I had to keep her on a leash. I couldn’t have been responsible for her actions.

I don’t know what they were thinking as they pulled their dog and then their cat away from me. But you can bet that they wouldn’t have left me if it was any other animal. I can only hope they were just trying to get home. I was very frustrated. My heart broke a little bit for the two women. This was my park. They were just going to leave me for something as silly as an injured bird?

If you have a pit bull in your community and you would like them to start to learn a safe and social way to be, call us at 816.828.3030 or email us at [email protected]

This article originally appeared on Facebook, under the pseudonym of “Eddie”, and has been republished with permission from the author.

The mission of the Humane Society of Wichita and North Stafford County is to help animals live healthier lives through the promotion of animal adoptions, spay/neuter programs and humane education.

You can read a previous article in the Community Series by clicking here.

The mission of the Humane Society of Wichita and North Stafford County is to help animals live healthier lives through the promotion of animal adoptions, spay/neuter programs and humane education.

You can reach us by phone at 816.828.3030 or email us at [email protected]

This article originally appeared on Facebook, under the pseudonym of “Eddie”, and has been republished with permission from the author.

The mission of the Humane Society of Wichita and North Stafford County is to help animals live healthier lives through the promotion of animal adoptions, spay/neuter programs and humane education.

You can reach us by phone at 816.828.3030 or email us at [email protected]

This article originally appeared on Facebook, under the pseudonym of “Eddie”, and has been republished with permission



Comments:

  1. Eddy

    Tell me, do you have an RSS feed on this blog?

  2. Arashijinn

    It is better if you write about what you know for sure and have tried it on your own experience, otherwise you are pouring water that is meaningless in essence

  3. Brooks

    I at you I can ask?

  4. Fausar

    This version is out of date



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